VOCABULARY FOR IELTS – SUBLIST 6 (65)

Featured Word:
Exceed  means to do more than is allowed or more than is required. It can be a good thing or a bad thing. For example, if you exceed the speed limit when you are driving, that is not good because it is dangerous and you may get a fine. To exceed the results you need for IELTS would be a good thing.

Examples:

  • I  had to pay and extra $380 at the airport because my luggage exceeded the weight allowance.
  • I was hoping to get an overall B for my Year 12 results so that I could get into a Nursing course at university. But I exceeded my expectations. I got an A, so now I am thinking about applying for Medicine instead.

Collocations: When you learn new vocab, make sure that you note collocations too. For this group of words some collocations are:
an excess of, exceed expectations, excessive noise
an expert in, expert advice, expertly finished
explicit instructions, explicit advice
federal funding, a federation of
fee structure, fees for, fees are due

Note that different collocations can have quite different meanings. They are not always alternatives.

Check the meanings of the words if you don’t already know them. Check the meanings of the various forms as sometimes they are different. You can check them at Time4english by clicking the words (http://www.time4english.com/aamain/lounge/awl.asp).

Academic Word List 65

Vocabulary for IELTS – Academic Word List 65

Complete the sentences below with the correct form of the word.

  1. The final product has ______________ our expectations. (exceed)
  2. They sought_______________ opinion on how to manage their financial strategy. (expert)
  3. She was given _______________ instructions on how to set up the lab. (explicit)
  4. The new_______________ of countries has vowed to fight climate issues. (federal)
  5. Most companies charge _______________ for accessing their data. (fee)

Answers (in the wrong order)
5. fees 3. explicit  2. expert  1. exceeded    4. federation

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